ultrasound to assess body composition

Using Ultrasound to Assess Body Composition in Premature Infants in the NICU

August 1, 2021

Early body composition changes in preterm infants are associated with later neurodevelopmental and metabolic health. Tools to measure body composition in preterm infants are emerging, but each has their own set of limitations. Fortunately, ultrasound can be performed at the patient’s bedside, with minimal movement of the patient and without exposure to radiation, allowing for more frequent measurements regardless of medical stability. A current study led by Sara Ramel, MD, will assess whether ultrasound measurements are predictive of later metabolic and neurodevelopmental outcomes in premature infants, a population at risk for developmental delay, obesity, and metabolic disease. "We hypothesize that a better understanding of these relationships will lead to the incorporation of ultrasound into routine nutritional management of preterm infants and allow for future optimization of their overall health and development," said Ramel. Learn more about this study.

Other News

child with brain illustration
A study on the use of a neuroimaging technique called precision functional mapping for transcranial magnetic stimulation in children.
Aidan Mehta, 12, will receive comprehensive care for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at the new Masonic Institute for the Developing Brain (MIDB).
MIDB makes it easier for families – like Feroza Mehta and her son, Aidan – to get comprehensive care for autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
Masonic Institute for the Developing Brain signage
The Masonic Institute for the Developing Brain aims to bridge gaps across treatment, research and community integration.